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Preston Tucker Had Big Dreams, But Who Was He?

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Tucker, The Man and His Dream

Preston Thomas Tucker was an automotive genius who dreamt only of becoming an independent car maker in an automotive landscape dominated by Ford, General Motors and Chrysler. In case you’ve never seen Tucker: The Man and His Dream, the 1988 biographical comedy-drama film based on his legacy, here is his story…

During World War II (1941 to 1945), nearly all US automobile companies stopped production to build war machinery, leaving the American public without new cars for almost 5 years. With millions of young men and women returning home after the war ended in 1945 to resume their lives and start families, Preston Tucker saw an opportunity to finally realize his dream and proceeded to establish the Tucker Motor Corporation.

Tucker gained years of experience prior to WWII working at several car manufacturers and honestly believed he could make a car that was superior to what the big three were building. The first order of business was to obtain financing, but he soon discovered that securing loans from investors meant giving up a fair amount of control. He wanted complete control of his new company, forcing him to do something rather unusual at the time.

You see, Tucker began selling dealer franchises before he had built a single car. Expectedly, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) took notice and kept a keen eye on his business.

Undeterred, the intrepid entrepreneur forged ahead with the design of his first car, the “Tucker Torpedo,” having commissioned famed designer Alex Tremulis to design it. The car was completely hand-made and became affectionately known as the “Tin Goose” by Tucker employees.

The Tucker Torpedo was very advanced for its time, featuring a rear mounted-engine, three “steerable” headlights, a spacious interior and many other innovative features.

By the spring of 1948, Tucker had a pilot production line in operation but soon realized that he was some $5 million short of keeping it going. To raise cash, he began a pre-purchase plan for Tucker automobile accessories, such as radios and seat covers. This was again before any cars were actually built!

Although he succeeded in raising the $2 million, the move was the final straw for the SEC, who launched a full-scale investigation on May 28, 1948, that saw Tucker Motors cease operations. Nearly 1,600 highly-trained workers were let go, effectively bringing an end to the shirt-lived company.

Preston Tucker with Tucker Torpedo

Tucker passed away a few years following the SEC crackdown but not before leaving a remarkable chapter in automotive entrepreneurship. Through hard work and some daring moves, he made his dream of running his very own car company come true.

Directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Jeff Bridges, Tucker: The Man and His Dream released in the United States on August 12, 1988, and was very well-received by critics despite not being a box office success. It currently has an aggregate score of 84% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Source: VW of Peoria

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Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 Non-Spoiler Review

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Guardians Of Galaxy Vol 2 team

The fifteen movie in the Marvel cinematic universe is an entertaining fusion of action, comedy and heart-wrenching drama.

Following up to the funny and action-packed formation of the team in the first movie, Guardian Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 sees the Guardians travel the universe to unravel the mystery behind Peter Quill’s parentage. And that’s essentially the plot — simple and short.

I enjoyed Guardian Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 a lot more than I thought I would. It strikes a nice balance between action, humor and drama. Whereas the first movie’s sole intention was to bring the team together, this one flushes out not just Quill, but also the other characters, including antagonists Nebula, Yondu and Mantis, a new character whose abilities adds greatly to the humor.

In Guardian Of The Galaxy Vol. 2, we get an understanding of why Drax is so obsessed with killing Thanos, and why Thano’s own daughter, Gamora, not only detests him, but also wants him dead.
As for Rocket Raccoon’s tough, big-guy attitude, let’s just say it all stems from a traumatizing experience that transcends animal abuse. You will definitely feel for him.

We don’t get to learn a lot about Groot, unfortunately, but what little screen time he has is entertaining and memorable.

Nebula’s bitter and destructive rivalry with sister Gamora rears its ugly head in Guardians 2, but there is a lot more complexity to their relationship that we learn about. Daddy issues, anyone?

Yondu’s backstory in connection with Quill’s is arguably the most heart-wrenching. The blue alien man has some serious depth to him and there is a very good reason why he couldn’t kill Quill in Guardians 1.

In fact, I would go as far as to say that without Yondu’s sub-plot, Guardians 2 wouldn’t have been as engaging.

Not only does Guardians 2 add more meat to each character’s lore, but it does so with sheer quality in everything — writing, acting, cinematography, etc. — and at the right amounts.

The writing, while predictable at times, is as good as in any other marvel movie and masterfully executed by the cast.. The characters are portrayed masterfully, and you can connect and empathize with each one, good guy or baddie.

As for cinematography, while the Marvel Cinematic Universe has built a reputation for and even reinvented the scope and artistry of ensemble action, I think the Guardian films are the most dazzling of all the Marvel series.

Like the first Guardians, Guardian 2 is a swashbuckling adventure flick complete with a vibrant array of sweeping panoramas, epic action sequences, dynamic framing and composition, with a healthy serving of slapstick comedy injected throughout.

The CGI is mostly spot on, demonstrating Marvel’s mastery of the art. One CGI character especially had me fooled.

Music is another hallmark of the Guardians Of The Galaxy films, and Guardians 2 delivers in spades. While you may not agree with the song selection, you will appreciate how well they are used throughout the adventure, be it during the chaos of the opening credits, big action pieces or scene transitions .

Guardian Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 is a thoroughly enjoyable superhero movie, but I can see a few places where film and especially comic book enthusiasts will find issue.

The first deals with the main crux of the story — Peter finding his father Ego. Many viewers will find it fairly predictable, but the writers probably couldn’t have done anything drastically original with with. I found it to be fine, but nothing special.

Speaking of Ego, avid comic book fans may scuff at his backstory deviating from the comics. The same can be said about the true relations between Quill and Yondu, and many other dissimilarities that carry over from the first movie.

This is not a major issue, however, considering that most audiences know relatively little about Star-Lord’s squad and have no basis of comparison.

Finally, there is an increase in comedy compared to Guardians 1, and it could feel at times that the movie is trying too hard with the humor. The gratuitous amount of silly gags could turn off those looking for something more dialed-backed and mature.

As funny, dramatic, action-packed and even cliche as Guardian Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 is, it is really about family at the core, particularly building and repairing relationships. It tries to cement the relationships between the original characters, while adding a new one.

It delivers an action adventure that ticks nearly all the right boxes. It has a more than an adequate script, impeccable acting, great humor and great cinematography, but in the end, it was the quirky roster of heroes (and anti-heroes) and their chemistry that sells the flick.

Like it or not, Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2 will put a smile on your face.

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Top 5 Worst Alien Invasion Movies Ever

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Independence Day Resurgence

The timeless tale of the alien invasion remains a staple of summer blockbusters. For years we’ve been able to look to the skies in terror and then sit back and enjoy the show. Sadly, not all of these movies have been out of this world (pun intended), and quite a number left viewers nodding their heads in disappointment.

Here are five alien movies that merely crash landed onto Earth. The real horror is how terrible they truly are — let us know if you agree with our list…

Independence Day Resurgence

Independence Day: Resurgence

Say what you want about Will Smith, but his decision not to return for this bloated sequel might be one of the smartest things he ever did in his whole career. While the movie maintained its original director in Roland Emmerich and was even able to bring back Jeff Goldblum and Bill Pullman (among others), it wasn’t enough to save this sorry sequel. The effects are just as bombastic and ridiculous as you’d expect, but critics point out that the sequel is really a poor copy of the original. It’s really just a rehash of the same—and much better and more original—movie from 20 years ago with none of its charm. Sadly, Resurgence simply has no heart and Bill Pullman’s famous speech really only works the first time.

Signs, Alien Movie

Signs

Signs was the beginning of the end for M. Night Shyamalan as a competent filmmaker. Riding high off the success of The Sixth Sense and Unbreakable, the director attempted to repeat the feat with this alien thriller. While not a completely terrible movie, the aliens themselves look ridiculous and feature some of the worst design you’ll ever see. Plus, the weakness of the aliens is just downright silly. Why would the aliens come to a planet that has more than 70 percent of it covered by their main weakness?

cowboys and aliens, movie

Cowboys and Aliens

On paper, this seemed like a win-win for over-the-top popcorn movies. However, what fans got was a bloated mess of special effects that was both a critical and financial failure. It should have done better, as the cast included Harrison Ford, Daniel Craig, and Olivia Wilde, and the movie was directed by Jon Favreau, of Iron Man and The Jungle Book fame. Unfortunately, this wasn’t enough to save the movie. Fortunately, the film continues to live on in video game form, with its inclusion amongst other slot reels for browsers and mobile devices. It makes full use of the wild west and sci-fi mash-up, and as you might expect, it’s actually a much more fun way to spend your time than watching this mess of a movie.

Plan 9 from outer space, movie

Plan 9 From Outer Space

This classic has been often called the worst movie ever made. Director Ed Wood was the Uwe Boll of his day, and Plan 9 From Outer Space might be both the best and worst movie he ever made. Despite the shoestring budget, Wood was able to hire Dracula actor Bela Lugosi to star in the picture, but the actor’s untimely death had the director resort to using his wife’s chiropractor as a stand-in. The UFOs are clearly cheap models hung on strings and the film is riddled by problems such as boom microphones dropping into shots and actors clearly reading directly from their scripts. A touchstone of bad filmmaking, Plan 9 is a must-see for anyone that loves movies that are so bad they’re good.

Battle - Los Angeles

Battle: Los Angeles

This movie was almost impressive in how utterly forgettable it was. First, find someone that saw Battle: Los Angeles, now ask them to tell you one thing that actually happened during this movie. No one remembers anything about it and when they do they’re usually remembering another film entirely. With a cast completely lacking in any star power, this flick was practically made to fail. And even though the gaming adaptation has some shoddy reviews, (like Cowboys and Aliens) at least the video game is more enjoyable than the film itself.

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The Story of the First Civilian Jeeps

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1950 Willys Jeepster

Would any war movie or TV show (e.g. Nash) set in the 21st century be complete without at least one Willys Jeep strolling around, possibly being shot at?

By now, most people know that the seemingly evergreen Jeep got its start in World War II, where it served as transportation for soldiers, military officers and their gear. In fact, while virtually all the other car manufacturers had to shut down so that their resources could be used for the Allied war effort, Willys Corporation, the company responsible for the Willys Jeep, was kept in operation 24/7 and built some 360,000 vehicles by the end of the war.

After the war was over, every car manufacturers was eager to get back into making civilian vehicles. After all, there was huge pent-up demand among civilians, who had to wait the duration of the entire war (5 years) to buy a new car. Factor in all the returning GIs and you had many people wanting cars and trucks.

Accordingly, in 1948, Willys launched the Willys Jeepster VJ-2, a civilian vehicle loosely based on the Jeeps used in the war. Priced at just $1,765, the VJ-2 came with many standard features that were a first for the time, including chrome hubcaps, whitewall tires, bumper guards, dual horns, and — get ready for this — a dash-mounted cigarette lighter.

The Jeepster proved modestly successful, but Willys’ competitors were hardly standing on the sidelines picking their noses. Most had abandoned the military look for cars with sleek, modern styling, and soon their models started dominating the market.

In response, Willys quickly updated the Jeepster and released the “greatly improved” 1949 Jeepster with a lower base price of just $1,495 and a more powerful, 6 cylinder model (the VJ3-6) priced at $1,530. While sales picked up for a short while, production ended up totaling only 2,960 units for the year — a stunningly low number!

Forging ahead, the company introduced two versions of the 1950 Jeepster, which featured revamped styling highlighted by a new horizontal grill design. One (the VJ-473) sourced its power from a new four-cylinder engine, while the other (VJ-473) packed a six-cylinder unit.

The optimism was there, but the sales wasn’t. Only 5,845 units of the 1950 Jeepster were produced, of which 4,066 were four-cylinder models and 1,779 were the six cylinder model. The Jeepster was still performing well below expectations.

Despite the 3-year production run (1948 – 1950), it was clear the Jeepster was never going to catch on with the general public and production was brought to an end. In all, just 19,131 units of the rugged SUV were made since its introduction in 1948.

According to the Jeep aficionados at Portland Chrysler Jeep, the Jeeps of today have come a long way since the Jeepster days and are among the most popular vehicles on the market. You probably know someone who owns one…

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